“A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity, an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.”

One-Way Video Interviews

Nowadays, with microphones and cameras embedded into mobile devices and laptops, we have more features accessible to us than ever before. Employers are mindful of this, some of which are revolutionizing the way job interviews are conducted. One-way video interviews are becoming the new standard when it comes to preliminary interviews. Mind you, phone screen interviews remain commonplace. Both phone screen and one-way video interviews are performed by an employer to determine if an applicant meets the criteria for a position. This cutting-edge technique modernizes the way traditional interviews are conducted.

About One-Way Video Interviews

When being interviewed for a job, we have become used to in-persons consultations. We expect a potential employer to make queries about our experience and skills. We, as applicants, offer insight in return, and if things go well, advance towards the next stage of the process. In a one-way interview, an applicant’s responses to questions are taped for the employer to review in the future (as opposed to a live conversation happening between two parties). Typically, this interview occurs at the start of the screening process, usually over the phone. In the past, this was the initial step when employers met with applicants for a position. The idea is straight-forward: the employer can ask for a video from an applicant, who responds to pre-written interview queries within a certain time frame. Afterward, staff members can review the candidate’s responses at their discretion.

Managing One-Way Video Job Interviews

How can you make a one-way interview successful? Get ready for them and stick to these steps:

Go over and follow directions meticulously : You will successfully showcase your capacity to work cautiously and attentively by sticking to instructions given to you for the interview. Bypassing this step – or simply scrolling through the directions – may take you off the board as a potential employee right off the bat. Don’t make assumptions or try to improvise – just stick to the instructions, period.

Keep the login details in a convenient place : When you are sent an invitation to be interviewed, you will be given a URL to log into. Login details, such as the interviewer or employer’s name, an interview identifier, and perhaps a password, might be issued to you. Ensure you have that on hand.

Conduct Some Research : If you obtain interview questions ahead of time, capitalize on it so you are thoroughly prepared. Write out your responses beforehand, keeping in mind that you will be trying to articulate stories that exemplify your achievements. If you don’t obtain interview questions ahead of time – which is very likely – be ready to offer prepared responses to common queries of this process. Concentrate on the obstacles you have overcome, the steps you took to handle them, and the outcomes you were left with. When the interview is transpiring, keep a copy of your resume and job description nearby to look at if you need to.

Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse : I can’t stress this enough – you must memorize your answers and sound natural when giving them. You won’t sound genuine if you haven’t practiced what to say in advance, so memorize and rehearse as much as you need to like you were an actor preparing for a starring role.

Wear the right clothes : Not having to be in person for the interview doesn’t mean you don’t have to dress up for it. You should be applicably groomed and dressed. Don’t wear anything detracting like jewelry or vibrant colors. You want the interviewer to concentrate on you, not your wardrobe.

Look straight into the camera : Look straight into the camera instead of your monitor when you are responding to a query. Visualize the interviewer being there with you in person and act as if you are engaging with them.

Be mindful of the time : Typically, these interviews are conducted within a brief window of time. Have a clock nearby so you can see how much time you have remaining.

Send what the employer is asking for on time : You will likely be able to select an interview time that accommodates your schedule, perhaps on the weekend or after work if you have a full-time job. The employer will probably establish a deadline of when the interview is to be concluded by. Figure out what this deadline is and send the employer what they’re asking for on time. When feasible, send your video ahead of time to demonstrate your lack of tardiness.

Ensure you can access the proper devices : You could use a smartphone for the interview as long as it has a built-in camera. With that said, you will make a stronger impression with a computer-connected camera as long as it has a speaker and microphone. Verify with the interviewer that a smartphone is okay to use if you have no alternative. Inspect the Internet connection to ensure its functional prior to the start of the interview no matter what device you’re using. Check to see that your camera and microphone are running as they should. What good is having the right answers to an employer’s questions if they can’t hear or see you speak?

Be prepared to answer questions : If you obtain interview questions ahead of time, capitalize on it so you are thoroughly prepared. Write out your responses beforehand, keeping in mind that you will be trying to articulate stories that exemplify your achievements. If you don’t obtain interview questions ahead of time – which is very likely – be ready to offer prepared responses to common queries of this process. Concentrate on the obstacles you have overcome, the steps you took to handle them, and the outcomes you were left with. When the interview is transpiring, keep a copy of your resume and job description nearby to look at if you need to.

Less is more : Be wary about the background when conducting an interview. Select a quiet area where, ideally, the sole person seen and heard on camera will be you. Refrain from conducting the interview in busy areas with distractions surrounding you. The background should be generic, perhaps a solid-colored wall without any artwork or posters. When feasible, keep a light in front of you. In doing so, your face will be properly illuminated. Evaluate the lighting to determine the most optimal placement for it – a lamp above your head shining down on you (behind the camera) tends to be the most complimenting placement.

Optimize yourself : To be the best version of yourself you can be, make sure your posture is correct. Lean forward and sit straight, retain eye contact, smile when applicable, and showcase your personality. Speak slowly using a properly modulated tone. Don’t fidget, mumble, or whisper. Practicing how to speak will stop you from slipping up during the interview process, which is why preparation is so important. If you can tape yourself practicing, go for it! You will quickly see what you’re doing well and what you need to work on.

Speak to a Recruiter